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2013   Volume No 25 – pages 204-214

Title: 405 nm light exposure of osteoblasts and inactivation of bacterial isolates from arthroplasty patients: potential for new disinfection applications?

Author: RS McDonald, S Gupta, M Maclean, P Ramakrishnan, JG Anderson, SJ MacGregor, RMD Meek, MH Grant

Address: University of Strathclyde, Bioengineering Unit, Wolfson Centre, 06 Rottenrow, Glasgow, Strathclyde G4 0NW UK

E-mail: m.h.grant at strath.ac.uk

Key Words: Healthcare associated infections (HAI); High-intensity narrow-spectrum (HINS) light; disinfection; 405 nm light; osteoblast cell cultures; bactericidal effects; Staphylococcus.

Publication date: March 7th 2013

Abstract: Infection rates after arthroplasty surgery are between 1-4 %, rising significantly after revision procedures. To reduce the associated costs of treating these infections, and the patients’ post-operative discomfort and trauma, a new preventative method is required. High intensity narrow spectrum (HINS) 405 nm light has bactericidal effects on a wide range of medically important bacteria, and it reduced bacterial bioburden when used as an environmental disinfection method in a Medical Burns Unit. To prove its safety for use for environmental disinfection in orthopaedic theatres during surgery, cultured osteoblasts were exposed to HINS-light of intensities up to 15 mW/cm2 for 1 h (54 J/cm2). Intensities of up to 5 mW/cm2 for 1 h had no effect on cell morphology, activity of alkaline phosphatase, synthesis of collagen or osteocalcin expression, demonstrating that under these conditions this dose is the maximum safe exposure for osteoblasts; after exposure to 15 mW/cm2 all parameters of osteoblast function were significantly decreased. Viability (measured by protein content and Crystal Violet staining) of the osteoblasts was not influenced by exposure to 5 mW/cm2 for at least 2 h. At 5 mW/cm2 HINS-light is an effective bactericide. It killed 98.1 % of Staphylococcus aureus and 83.2 % Staphylococcus epidermis populations seeded on agar surfaces, and is active against both laboratory strains and clinical isolates from infected hip and knee arthroplasties. HINS-light could have potential for development as a method of disinfection to reduce transmission of bacteria during arthroplasty, with wider applications in diverse surgical procedures involving implantation of a medical device.

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Last modified March 7, 2013

Open Access / Author retains copyright

AO Foundation, Davos, Switzerland